What is the Milk Checker?
Milk Checker is a digital detector that detects bovine mastitis with extreme precision.
Through a quick and simple test, Milk Checker is capable of detecting clinical and subclinical mastitis simultaneously within seconds in all four quarters of the udder. Made in Japan, Milk Checker utilizes the most advanced technology to produce reliable results, guaranteeing the health of your herd.
Advantages
Fast and reliable
With Milk Checker, it only takes seconds to detect sub-clinical mastitis in cattle. Milk Checker analyzes the milk samples from 4 quarters of the udder and displays the results at once. In addition, thanks to an innovative technology, Milk Checker is more reliable than other methods of mastitis detection.
Unlike the complicated California Mastitis Test (also known as a "paddle test"), which is subjective and requires mixing the milk with a solution, Milk Checker numerically displays results on digital display, with decimal precision, thus saving time and money.
Monitors your herd's health
Milk Checker is an important ally in the management of your herd. By using Milk Checker regularly throughout the lactation period, one can easily identify the infected cattle and separate them from the rest of your herd. In addition, Milk Checker can also be used to determine the efficiency of antibiotic treatment. This way, you control the health of your herd, improve the quality of milk, and hence increase your profit.
Prevents outbreaks of clinical mastitis
Don’t let your animal develop clinical mastitis! Every year, mastitis outbreaks result in substantial losses for dairy farmers. Therefore, prevention is imperative. With Milk Checker, you detect infection at a preliminary stage, when it is still imperceptible. Thus, you avoid the high costs of veterinary treatment, antibiotics, and discarding milk and cattle, etc.
Milk Checker's quality has been tested and approved in Japan
Milk Checker is a product approved by the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries of Japan - whose criteria for the approval of veterinary equipment are as strict as those of the Ministry of Health of Japan (equivalent to the FDA in Japan).
Therefore, Milk Checker is favored mastitis detector in most countries with high quality control of milk such as Japan, Australia, and New Zealand.
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Description
1. Sampling Cup
Just a single cup is required for measuring the 4 quarters of the udder. Rinsing is not necessary! Pour some milk into the cup, press the TEST button, dispose of the milk, and go to the next teat.
2. Splash guard
Prevents the milk from splashing onto the screen.
3. Lightweight and handy
The Milk Checker can easily be held with one hand.
4. Fast and Easy-To-Use
With easy-to-use buttons, testing only takes a few seconds.
5. Internal Computer
Milk Checker makes use of innovative technology! Its internal memory eliminates the need to take note of individual readings. The results are displayed simultaneously.
6. Safety Strap
Allows you to attach the device to your wrist for easy handling.
7. Temperature Sensor
Allows accurate results, regardless of the ambient temperature. Thanks to it, the test can be done at any time of the day, all year round.
8. Electrode Sensors
Measure the electrical conductivity of milk with precise accuracy, detecting even the smallest differences among the teats.
9. Digital Display
Displays the results of the four quarters of the udder simultaneously with clarity and precision.
10. Sturdy Frame
Coated with highly resistant plastic, Milk Checker withstands drops of up to 1.5 meter (4.9ft) and is fully waterproof. Even if accidentally dropped in water or milk, it will still work perfectly.
Why buy the Milk Checker?
With Milk Checker you avoid the losses caused by mastitis and increases the production of high quality milk.
Subclinical Mastitis is an infection that is hard to detect, being imperceptible to the naked eye. If not detected in time, it will develop into clinical mastitis, resulting in substantial loss for producers.
Not only will you lose the production of milk, there will be significant costs for treatment and antibiotics, and in severe cases, even discarting the cow.

Milk Checker detects mastitis before parturition, colostrum phase and during the milking period, besides verifying the effectiveness of antibiotic treatment.
Comparison
Milk Checker, the mastitis detector that replaces the CMT (California Mastitis Test).
The CMT requires a chemical reagent to mix the milk sample with in order to gain results, based on the observation of the solution color and coagulation obtained. Therefore being a subjective diagnostic, depending on who does the exam, the result is not accurate and is subject to errors. The CMT is complicated to be done daily, requiring more time and luminosity, to closely observe the coloration of the mixture.

Milk Checker does not require the use of reagents and numerically displays the results with decimal precision within seconds. Because it is fast and convenient, testing with Milk Checker can easily be done daily at any time of the day.

See below the comparisons between the Milk Checker and the California Mastits Test (CMT) and learn why Milk Checker is the only mastitis detector that's worth your money!
CMT (California
Mastitis Test)
Milk Checker
Image of product
Can the test be done quickly (within seconds)?
Are the results reliable?
Is the interpretation of data done by computer, with decimal precision?
Can the test be done in an environment with low visibility?
Can it be used from one cow to another without washing?
Does it have a digital display?
Does not require use of chemical reagent?
Does it have temperature sensor?
Does it have one cup for all four quarters?
Does it have easy viewing buttons? ---
Does it have low power consumption
(less than 1mA)?
---
How Milk Checker works
Milk Checker is a portable, lightweight device that has electrodes sensors that detect any abnormalities in the electrical conductivity of the milk. When an inflammation in the mammary glands (mastitis) occurs, certain components of the blood plasma (such as sodium and chlorine ions) pass into the milk, increasing its electrical conductivity. This abnormality is measured by Milk Checker, which detects mastitis even before their symptoms are apparent to the naked eye.

Since subclinical mastitis does not develop in all four quarters at the same time, Milk Checker automatically calculates the differences of measurements in the 4 quarters and identifies the infected quarter.
How to use Milk Checker
With Milk Checker it only takes a few seconds to detect subclinical mastitis.
See step by step how to do the test.
1. Press the button ON/OFF to turn Milk Checker on.
For a number of seconds, the display will show an indication of check (see figure below)
2. Next, milk the sample directly from the teat into the collecting cup.
Fill it almost to the brim (about 20 ml).
3. Press the button TEST.
The display will show the absolute value of the electrical conductivity (ABS) of the teat on the upper left of the screen. (OBS.: the values in this example are for illustrative purposes only)
4. Empty the sampling cup.
5. Repeat the process with the second teat from step 2.
Warning: It is not necessary to wash the collecting cup between the samplings of one teat to another.
The measurement of the second teat will appear on the upper right of the screen.
Repeat with the remaining teats. After measuring the last teat, Milk Checker will display the 4 measurements in the following order: top left, top right, bottom left, and bottom right. Example below:
6. Press the TEST button again to display the difference in electrical conductivity (DIF). It will show the difference of measurements with the teat with the lowest electrical conductivity (displaying the value 0.0) in the order of lowest to highest.
7. After finishing the test, press the RESET button to clear the display and then perform the test on the next cow.
How to analyze the results
Learn the criteria used by Milk Checker to evaluate the milk.
ABS
Electric conductivity (mS/cm)
DIF
Difference (mS/cm)
Normal milk < 6.2 < 0.5
Abnormal milk ≥ 6.2 < 0.5
Infected milk (mastitis) < 6.2 ≥ 0.5
Infected milk (mastitis) ≥ 6.2 ≥ 0.5
When the absolute value of the electric conductivity (shown on the display of the Milk Checker as ABS) is equal to or greater than 6.2 mS/cm, the milk is considered abnormal. When the difference of the conductivity (shown on the display of the Milk Checker as DIF) is equal to or greater than 0.5 mS/cm, the milk is considered infected.

Below are some examples of measurements.
EXAMPLE 1 - NORMAL MILK:
Farm A ran a test using Milk Checker on a cow of breed X, obtaining the results above. Note that the absolute values of conductivity (ABS) of all 4 quarters were lower than 6.2 mS/cm. In addition, the conductivity values of the differences (DIF) are all lower than 0.5 mS/cm. Therefore, this cow’s milk is NORMAL.
EXAMPLE 2 - NORMAL MILK:
Farm B ran a test using Milk Checker on a cow of breed Y, obtaining the results above. The absolute values of conductivity (ABS) of all 4 quarters are lower than 6.2 mS/cm and the values of the differences in conductivity (DIF) are lower than 0.5 mS/cm. Therefore, the milk is NORMAL.

Note that compared to Example 1, Example 2 shows the absolute values of conductivity (ABS) to be higher. Between a squad and another, there may be a difference in mean values ABS, due to factors such as breed, diet, pathological conditions or stress level. It should be noted, therefore, the difference in values of the teats (DIF). In this example, since all the cattle’s values were less than 0.5, the cattle does not have mastitis.
EXAMPLE 3 - ABNORMAL MILK:
The test with Milk Checker is made on another cattle from farm A. This cattle is in the production stage of colostrum and samples were collected two days after calving, obtaining the results above.
Note that, although the values in conductivity differences (DIF) are lower than 0.5 mS/cm the absolute values of conductivity (ABS) in all 4 quarters are greater than 6.2 mS/cm. Therefore, the milk is ABNORMAL (colostrum in this case).

Depending on the stage of lactation and the stress level of the cattle, values greater than 6.2 mS/cm can occur, which means the cattle may not necessarily have mastitis. In such cases, one must identify the cattle and perform proper inspection, maintaining the cattle free from stress. Periodically, one is advised to test the cattle with Milk Checker to see whether the milk is back to normal levels.
EXAMPLE 4 - INFECTED MILK:
In farm C, a test was made with Milk Checker from a cow breed Z, obtaining the results above. Although the absolute values of conductivity (ABS) of 3 quarters are lower than 6.2 mS/cm, one of the quarters displays a value greater than 6.2 mS/cm. Furthermore, the value of the difference in conductivity (DIF) is 0.7 in this quarter, which is greater than 0.5 mS/ cm.
Thus, the milk is INFECTED and the animal has mastitis.
In this case, the farmer should identify the cow and consult a veterinarian for proper diagnosis and treatment.
EXAMPLE 5 - INFECTED MILK:
In farm A, a test was made with Milk Checker from a cow breed Z, obtaining the results above. The absolute values of conductivity (ABS) of all quarters are lower than 6.2 mS/cm. However, the value of the difference in conductivity (DIF) of a quarter is higher than 0.5 mS/cm. Thus, milk is INFECTED.
In this case, one should identify the cow and consult a veterinarian for proper diagnosis and treatment.
IMPORTANT
  • The measured values of the absolute electrical conductivity (ABS) may vary according to breed, feed, lactation stage, pathological conditions, stress level, and among other factors of the cow.
  • The key to identify subclinical mastitis is in the difference (DIF) between quarters. If the value of difference is greater than or equal to 0.5, the animal is infected. If the difference in value exceeds 1.0 mS/cm, the infection is severe.
  • Between one device and another, there may be a variation of up to 0.2 mS/cm in the measurements of absolute electrical conductivity (ABS) for a teat. This variation is normal and does not interfere with the detection of mastitis because the most important aspect is to note the difference (DIF) between the teats, since mastitis does not develop in all teats simultaneously.
Maintenance
  1. It is necessary to rinse the collection cup once daily after use. Do not contact hard or sharp objects with the sensors (electrodes and temperature).
    Do not use strong chemicals (solvents, thinner, etc.) to clean the appliance.
  2. In the event of collection of colostrum or milk with severe mastitis (lump, blood or pus), it is necessary to wash the sampling cup with detergent.
  3. To remove lumps, use a soft cloth with neutral detergent.
  4. Do not immerse the appliance in water or any other liquid.
  5. Do not drop or bump the unit.
  6. Do not disassemble or attempt to repair the unit yourself. If necessary, contact your dealer.
  7. When batteries run out, a warning message will appears on the display, and the unit will automatically turn off. Open the battery compartment (located on the back of the device) with a screwdriver and replace the batteries with new ones (2 AA batteries).
FAQ
Ask questions about the Milk Checker and subclinical mastitis.

1. What is bovine mastitis?
A: Bovine mastitis is a disease characterized by inflammation of the mammary gland of dairy cows. The infection is caused by microorganisms, especially bacteria of the genera Staphylococcus, Streptococcus and also coliforms and is easily contagious and can transmitted between cows.

It is the most severe disease to dairy cattle due to the economic losses generated by it, the declining production, discarded milk and animals, and the spending for veterinary treatment and medication and etc.

It has two forms: clinical and subclinical. In the clinical stage symptoms are evident as changes in the secretion of milk in the udder is abnormal (increased temperature, swelling, pain and loss of function, dehydration, and etc.). However, in the subclinical stage, which is the most common, signs of the disease (infection intramammary) are not apparent. Therefore, it is often not detected in time and can progress to clinical mastitis.


2. How do you detect subclinical mastitis?
A: Subclinical mastitis can not be seen with the naked eye, so it can only be detected through laboratory tests, such as somatic cell count (SCC), or in field tests such as CMT (Califormia Mastitis Test) and Milk Checker.

CMT, also known as "paddle test" is the observation of the agglutination and the coloration of the mixture of the milk and a chemical reagent. According to the quantity of somatic cells in milk, it forms a gel of varying thickness. The result of the thickness of the gel, is given in scores, which generally ranges from 1 to 5. The CMT is interpreted subjectively and is therefore is subject to produce false positive or false negative results. Therefore a trained professional should perform the test.

Milk Checker is a device that has electrodes that measure the electrical conductivity of milk in milliSiemens per centimeter (mS/cm). When a given quarter of the udder is infected, the walls of the blood vessels dilate and other substances (other than somatic cells) of the blood, such as sodium and chloride ions, pass into milk increasing its electrical conductivity. The Milk Checker measures the electrical conductivities of the four quarters of the udder, then it compares and shows the numerical results on the digital display. Therefore, the result is exact, leaving no room for subjective interpretations.


3.Does Milk Checker count somatic cells in the milk?
A: No, the method used to detect mastitis by Milk Checker is by measuring the electrical conductivity of the milk. When a quarter is infected, chlorine and sodium ions pass from the blood vessels to the milk, increasing its electrical conductivity.

Normal milk has electrical conductivity up to 6.1 mS/cm. From 6.2 mS/cm and upward, the milk can be considered abnormal (see Question 4). However, the key to detect subclinical mastitis is the comparison between the figures obtained from the four quarters. If the difference between quarters is greater than 0.5 mS/cm (comparing to the quarter with the lowest electrical conductivity), it means that that quarter is infected.


4. What is the difference between "abnormal" and “infected" milk?
A: In accordance with the measurement criteria of Milk Checker, milk that has absolute electrical conductivity (ABS) equal to or greater than 6.2 mS/cm is considered abnormal. However, this does not necessarily mean the milk is infected (mastitis). There are several factors besides mastitis that can increase the electrical conductivity of milk such as lactation, food, hygienic conditions, and stress level etc. For example, a cow in production phase of colostrum may show levels above 6.2 mS/cm.

Milk that is already infected has a difference in conductivity (DIF) equal to or higher than 0.5 mS/cm in relation to the quarter with the lowest electrical conductivity in the same udder. This is due to the fact that subclinical mastitis does not occur simultaneously in all four quarters of the udder. Additionally, while the non-infected quarter with the lowest electrical conductivity shows the value of 0.0 (zero), the infected quarter shows value equal to or greater than 0.5 mS/ cm. If the difference in value is between 0.5 and 1.0 mS/cm, it is a mild infection. Above 1.0 mS/cm, the infection is severe.


5. Can you test the milk of all four quarters of the udder together with Milk Checker?
A: No, although Milk Checker has a single collecting cup to test the 4 quarters, milk samples should be collected and tested separately, in other words a quarter at a time. Do not mix the milk of the four quarters, as the results will be incorrect. The principle of Milk Checker consists of comparing 4 milk samples, each corresponding to a quarter of udder. This is the only possible way to identify the infected quarter (see how to use here).


6. Can you use Milk Checker soon after delivery?
A: Yes, Milk Checker can be used in all stages of lactation, even on the first day after birth. That way, it is possible to detect mastitis during the phase of colostrum.


7. Can you use Milk Checker in conjunction with the teat seal?
A: Yes, using a teat seal does not interfere with the functions of the Milk Checker.


8. Does Milk Checker dispense the need for veterinary diagnosis?
A: No, Milk Checker is a device for the detection of subclinical mastitis. Diagnosis and treatment should be done by a veterinarian or an expert.


9. Why and when to calibrate the Milk Checker?
A: Like any measuring instrument, the Milk Checker should always be calibrated to ensure accurate and reliable results. Milk Checker is carefully calibrated at the factory. However, it may be necessary to recalibrate the device periodically due to falls, misuse or when uncertain of measurement results.


10. How to calibrate Milk Checker?
Milk Checker can be calibrated with a solution of potassium chloride (KCl) in two ways:
A. KCl solution with 3 levels of concentration:
1. Pour 30ml of distilled water in the collection cup, and press the CAL button (located under the picture of the cow). The display will show "CAL" and the value 0.0.
2. Pour 30ml of 0.025M KCl solution in the collection cup and press the CAL button. The value 0.0 is canceled and the display will show "CAL" and 3.4M.
3. Pour 30ml of 0.05M KCl solution in the collection cup and press the CAL button. The value 3.4M will be canceled and the display will show "CAL" and 6.7M.
4. After completing the memorization of data from three KCl solutions, the calibration is complete. Note that the data indicated are within the range of accuracy. Then press the DELETE and make measurements normally.

Attention: If the calibration value is not within the range of accuracy, it may be that the concentration of the standard solution is not correct. If the normal values of the calibration cannot be obtained even using the correct concentration of the solution, turn off the power once and repeat the procedure.

B - 1 KCl solution concentration level:
1. Pour 30ml of 0.05M KCl solution in the collection cup and press the CAL button. The display will show "CAL" and 6.7M.
2. The calibration is complete. Press the RESET button and make measurements normally.
If the calibration value cannot be obtained even using the correct concentration of the solution, turn off the power once and repeat.

Note: Use standard solution in which the concentration of KCl is measured accurately. If the concentration of the standard solution is not exact, the values displayed are not correct. In case of a mistake in the operation, try calibrating it again. If necessary, consult your dealer.

Technical Specifications
Method of Measurement Measurement of electrical conductivity (E.C.)
Calculus Difference of electrical conductivity calculated by computer
Calibration Automatic
Statement reading 1. Three-digit digital display
2. Simultaneously indicates the absolute values of all quarters of the udder
3. Indicates the difference in electrical conductivity after calculation
4. Indicates the electrical conductivity calibrated
Measuring range 0 to 13 mS/cm (milli-Siemens per centimeter)
Accuracy 3% +or- 1 digit
Automatic temperature compensation +3 to 40ºC (offset to +25ºC)
Drop resistance 1.5m
Power 2 AA batteries
Consumption 0.45 mA
Dimensions 91 (width) x 45 (height) x 181mm (length)
Net weight 320g
Downloads
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